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Terminology

Brownfield: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines a brownfield site as, "real property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant." Essentially, brownfield sites are abandoned, idled, or underutilized properties that are complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination.

Brownfield Redevelopment: Development of real property expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.

CERCLA:
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) – Enacted by Congress in 1980. The act established prohibitions and requirements concerning closed and abandoned hazardous waste sites; provides for liability of persons responsible for releases of hazardous waste at these sites; and established a trust fund (“Superfund”) to provide for cleanup when no responsible party can be identified.

DTSC: California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) is a state agency that’s mission is to protect humans and environment from harmful effects of toxic substances by restoring contaminated resources, enforcing hazardous waste laws, reducing hazardous waste generation, and encouraging the manufacture of chemically safer products.
Western/ Gage Well
Greenfields: Undeveloped land with no previous use. Sometimes a property that was only used for light-agricultural purposes are considered a greenfield.
Infill Development: Development on vacant or underused properties within existing urban developed areas.

Land recycling: Land recycling is the act of recycling land, the reuse of abandoned, vacant, or underused urban properties for redevelopment.

Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA): Phase I ESA evaluates potential contamination concerns when approaching a brownfield redevelopment project. The Phase I ESA relies heavily on site visits, interviews with relevant parties, and historical documents and public records. The goal is to understand previous site use to help determine whether and what kind of contamination may exist. A Phase I ESA is required in order to qualify for federal liability defense protections and certain state protections. A Phase I ESA must be conducted by a certified environmental consultant.

Phase II Environmental Site Assessment: Phase II ESA is used for filling remaining data gaps when recognized environmental conditions (REC) are identified. Soil, groundwater, and vapor samples are collected to determine the extent of contamination. These reports also provide background information necessary to develop a cleanup strategy and estimate costs. A Phase II ESA is conducted by a certified environmental consultant.
Vacant Lot at Western & Gage - Terminology
RCRA: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is the law that creates the framework for the proper management of hazardous and non-hazardous solid waste. To achieve this, EPA develops regulations, guidance and policies that ensure the safe management and cleanup of solid and hazardous waste, and programs that encourage source reduction and beneficial reuse.

State Water Board
: State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) is a state agency that’s mission is to to preserve, enhance, and restore the quality of California's water resources and drinking water for the protection of the environment, public health, and all beneficial uses, and to ensure proper water resource allocation and efficient use, for the benefit of present and future generations.

Sprawl: Sprawl development is the unplanned, uncontrolled expansion of urban areas.

Sustainable Development: Is development without compromising the ability of future generations or economic development that is conducted without depletion of natural resources.

Sustainability
: Meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.
Albino Park - Terminology